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Press Release

Intel International Science And Engineering Fair Awards More Than $2 Million In Scholarships And Prizes To Students From 40 Countries

Teens from Florida and Ohio Win $40,000 Scholarships at 51st Intel ISEF

DETROIT, Mich., May 12, 2000 - The Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (Intel ISEF), the world's largest pre-college science competition, today recognized some of the world's brightest high school students for their scientific achievements with more than $2 million in scholarships and awards. Coming from 40 countries, 1,223 students ages 13 to 20 were judged on their creative ability, scientific thought, as well as the thoroughness, skill, and clarity shown in their projects.

The top Intel ISEF prize, the $40,000 Intel Young Scientist Scholarship, was awarded to Jason L. Douglas, 18, from Cincinnati Country Day School in Cincinnati, Ohio; Nazanin Jouei, 18, from Ely High School in Pompano Beach, Fla.; and Karen Kay Powell, 16, from Lincoln Park Academy in Fort Pierce, Fla. 

For his physics project, entitled "Discrete Electron Density Theory Finite Tensor Solutions to Schrodinger's Equation," Douglas developed a theory which mathematically explains the energy in atoms and can help better understand the world around us. Jouei's chemistry project, "Mechanisms of the Photoisomerization of Conjugated Dienes as a Model for the Primary Visual Event," worked with the chemistry of sight. She found a subtle chemical change that may help better explain vision. Powell's project, entitled "A Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) for Fat," studied the relationship between chemicals, genes and behavior. She found that chemical PNA can be used to regulate genes and, therefore, modify appetite.

A high-resolution photo is available at www.newscom.com

Other Winning Students 

  • Glenn T. Seaborg Nobel Prize Visit Award: Garrett J. Young, 17, a home schooled student from Branchburg, N.J., won for his physics project titled "Isolating Plasma Species Initiating Internal Electrostatic Fields for Plasma Heating." Young found a way to increase the temperature of plasma in an efficient way. The impact of his work may make energy from fusion more accessible in the future. Nazanin Jouei, 18, from Ely High School in Pompano Beach, Fla., won for her chemistry project titled "Mechanisms of the Photoisomerization of Conjugated Dienes as a Model for the Primary Visual Event." These students will travel to the Nobel Prize Ceremony in Stockholm, Sweden in December 2000. 
  • European Union Contest for Young Scientist Award: Travis Michael Beamish, 18, and Avaleigh Nora Milne, 18, both from Kingston Collegiate and Vocational Institute in Kingston, Ontario, Canada won for their botany project titled "Effects of Anesthetics on Channel Systems in Soybean Plants: Two-Year Study." The two will travel to this European Union science contest in Amsterdam in September 2000. 
  • Ireland Young Scientist and Technology Exhibit: Joseph E. Pechter, 18, and William H. Pechter, 18, both from Saint Edward's School in Vero Beach, Fla., won for their computer science project titled "Hybrid Text to Speech 2000: Phase II." They will travel to Ireland in January 2001 for this fair. 
  • Intel ISEF Best of Category Awards-The following students each received a $5,000 award for earning the highest ratings in their project categories:

  •  
    • Behavioral and Social Sciences - Kathy Hsinjung Li, 17, from Plano Senior High School in Plano, Texas, for her project titled "Patterns, Pressure and Preference Influence of Social Pressure and Mathematical Patterns on Musical Preference in Adolescents." 
    • Biochemistry - Joel Lewis Stevens, 17, from The Academy of Sciences and Technology in Conroe, Texas, for his project titled "DNA Computation of a Subset Sum: Phase II." 
    • Botany, presented by the Environmental Protection Agency - Yu-Jen Lee, 18, from National Hsiu-chu Senior High School in Hsiu-Chu, Chinese Taipei, for the project titled "Sex Organ Development and Interbreeding Mechanisms of Cyathea Spinulosa." 
    • Chemistry, presented by the Rohm and Haas Company - Nazanin Jouei, 18, from Ely High School in Pompano Beach, Fla., for her project titled "Mechanisms of the Photoisomerization of Conjugated Dienes as a Model for the Primary Visual Event." 
    • Computer Science - Robert Y. Wang, 16, from Conway High School in Conway, Ariz., for his project titled "View-Dependent Continuous Level of Detail by Multiresolution Analysis." 
    • Earth and Space Sciences, presented by Scientific American - Jay Lawrence Michaels, 18, from Cocoa High School in Cocoa, Fla., for his project titled "Pulsecellular Tornadogenesis: Two-Year Study." 
    • Engineering - Ryan Randall Patterson, 16, from Central High School in Grand Junction, Colo., for his project titled "Sleuthbot Robotic Search Tool." 
    • Environmental Sciences, presented by the Environmental Protection Agency - Crystal Lynn Gammon, 17, from School of the Osage in Kaiser, Mo., for her project titled "Effects of Ivermectin on Dung Fauna Diversity." 
    • Gerontology, presented by the AARP Andrus Foundation - Benjamin Charles Beranek, 16, Jefferson High School in Lafayette, Ind., for his project titled "Influence of Sex Hormones on Development of Bone Cancer." 
    • Mathematics, presented by the Panasonic Consumer Electronics Company - Ching Tang Chen, 15, from Taipei Municipal Chien-Kuo Senior High School in Taipei, Chinese Taipei, for the project titled "C-Transformation Introduction of a New Geometric Transformation." 
    • Medicine and Health presented by Merck Research Laboratories - Joshua Michael Levy, 18, from Quince Orchard High School in Gaithersburg, Md., for his project titled "mtCLIC p53 and TNF-ALPHA Regulated Mitochondrial Chloride Channel Involved in Apoptosis." 
    • Microbiology - Linda J. Arnade, 17, Palm Bay High School in Melbourne, Fla., for her project titled "Analyzing for a Correlation Between Chlamydia Pneumoniae and Nitric Oxide in the Development of Atherosclerosis and Creation of New Clinical Diagnostic Scales and Mathematical Models: Multi-Phase Investigation." 
    • Physics - Michael T. Hasper, 17, from Maclay High School in Tallahassee, FL for his project titled "Violin Bridge:Will the Stradivarius Legend Continue?" 
    • Zoology - Kerry Ann Geiler, 17, from Massapequa High School in Massapequa, N.Y. for her project titled "Ants Go Marching Two by Two: Multivariate Analysis of the Physical and Chemical Communication of Formicidae Species." 
    • Team Project, presented by Science News - Travis Michael Beamish, 18, and Avaleigh Nora Milne, 18, from Kingston Collegiate and Vocational Institute, Kingston, Ontario, Canada for their project titled "Effects of Anesthetics on Channel Systems in Soybean Plants: Two-Year Study." 
    • Best Use of a Personal Computer Award - Each of the following recipients will receive a high-performance mobile computer with an Intel® Pentium® III processor featuring Intel® SpeedStep™ technology.

    •  
      • Eser Kubali Chamoglu, 17, Horace Mann School in Bronx, N.Y. for the project titled "Qbots System for Developing Mobile Robot Software in Less Time for Less Cost." 
      • Jason L. Douglas, 18, from Cincinnati Country Day School in Cincinnati, Ohio, for his project titled "Discrete Electron Density Theory Finite Tensor Solutions to Schrodinger's Equation." 
      • Ryan Randall Patterson, 16, Central High School in Grand Junction, Colo., for his project titled "Sleuthbot Robotic Search Tool." 
      • Lauren Beth Sendek, 18, from McKeesport Area Senior High School in McKeesport, Pa., for her project titled "Gems Genetically-Evolved Molecular Structures." 
      • Robert Y. Wang, 16, from Conway High School in Conway, Ariz., for his project titled "View-Dependent Continuous Level of Detail by Multiresolution Analysis." 

Awards to Schools, Fair Directors and Teachers

As part of Intel's commitment to improving science and math education worldwide, schools and fair directors whose finalists win the Intel Young Scientist Scholarship, Best of Category and First Place category awards at the Intel ISEF 2000 will each receive $1,000 to benefit science and math education and encourage more student involvement in science. The school award is targeted to support each school's science and math education programs. The fair director award is used to support the regional administration of the Intel ISEF and to encourage more student participation in Intel ISEF-affiliated fairs in particular regions. 

In addition, teachers were nominated by their peers and affiliated fair directors to receive the Intel Excellence in Teaching Award. Recipients were selected based on demonstrated excellence in supporting the teaching and learning of science. Awards range from $1,000 to $5,000. Marcus Friskop, from Hankinson Public School in Hankinson, N.D. won the top award of $5,000.

For a complete list of student, teacher, school and fair director award recipients, visit www.sciserv.org/isef. 

Background

The Intel ISEF has been coordinated for the past 51 years by Science Service, a non-profit organization dedicated to advancing the understanding and appreciation of science among people of all ages through publications and educational programs. Each year a volunteer host committee representing the host city raises funds to sponsor events throughout the fair.

For more information on Science Service and the Intel ISEF, see www.sciserv.org

Intel Innovation in Education 

Intel's sponsorship of ISEF is part of the Intel Innovation in Education initiative, a global, multimillion dollar effort to help realize the possibilities of science and technology in education. The goal is to prepare today's teachers and students for tomorrow's demands. Intel develops and supports education programs that help meet the needs of students and communities worldwide through improving science, math, engineering and technology education; improving education through the effective use of technology in classrooms; and broadening access to technology and technical careers. 

Intel, the world's largest chip maker, is also a leading manufacturer of computer, networking and communications products. Additional information about Intel is available at www.intel.com/pressroom.

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